Subscribe to RSS - The U.S. Supreme Court

Critical Mass: Justices Gather In D.C. For Special Religious Service

The U.S. Supreme Court is back in session today, which means Justice Sonia Sotomayor has taken her seat on the bench for the first time.

Yesterday morning was another first for the junior justice. She attended the Red Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle as a VIP guest. Read more

Supreme Prejudice: Scalia Says Government Can Promote Religion

The U.S. Supreme Court is gearing up to come back into session Oct. 5, and just in time for that, Justice Antonin Scalia has decided to pop off in the media about how much he hates church-state separation – again!

In what is billed as an "Historic Exclusive Interview" in the Brooklyn-based Orthodox   Jewish newspaper Hamodia, Scalia attacks one of the core concepts of church-state separation – the idea that government must remain neutral between religion and non-religion. Read more

First Test: Sotomayor Will Help Decide Fate Of Cross In California Park

Yesterday afternoon, the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Sonia Sotomayor for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, the third woman and the first Latina to ever serve as a justice.

It's a historical milestone, and Americans United is looking forward to watching the new justice in action, particularly when it comes to church-state issues.

As we have mentioned before, we know very little about Sotomayor's views on our issues. That will change in upcoming months. Read more

Sotomayor And Religious Liberty: Court Nominee Says It's Central To The Constitution

As it turns out, we didn't have to wait too long for a question assessing Judge Sonia Sotomayor's thoughts on religious liberty.

Yesterday afternoon, as the Senate confirmation hearings continued, Sen. Benjamin Cardin (D-Md.) asked Sotomayor her views on freedom of religion, which he called "one of the basic principles of our Constitution." Read more

Sorting Out Sotomayor: Church-State Experts Wait For Answers, While The Southern Baptists Plunge Ahead

As you may have noticed, Judge Sonia Sotomayor's Senate confirmation hearings continue today.

We've heard a lot of griping about her "wise Latina" remark and her decision in the Ricci case, as well as witnessed outbursts from anti-abortionist protestors.

But to our knowledge, we have yet to hear anyone ask her about her views on church and state issues. Read more

Amen To Abington: High Court Decision Preserved Children's Religious Liberty

I grew up in Ohio in late '80s through the '90s. My parents, sisters and I were one of the few South Asian families in town, and I was one of only two Hindu students in my graduating class of nearly 350 students.

Fortunately for me, it mattered little that I was Hindu and most of my classmates were Christian. I can't really remember any time the school brought in religion -- a rarity I appreciated living so close to the Bible belt.

But had I been in sixth grade in 1962 rather than 1992, things might have been different. Read more

The Real World: Why Supreme Court Appointments Are So Important

It's possible "Tonight Show" Host Jay Leno already has conclusive results on this, but for today's purposes, I'm just going to make a wild assumption.

I'm going to assume that if I stopped the average American on the street and asked him or her to name all the U.S. Supreme Court justices, most would probably have no clue.

In fact, I doubt it would be much of a gamble to claim that many would not even know there are nine justices. Read more

Misplaced Priorities: Justice Thomas Does The Dishes, But Forgets The Bill Of Rights

We don't hear much from Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. He hasn't asked a question during oral arguments at the high court in more than two years.

So when the George H.W. Bush appointee does agree to speak at a public event, we look forward to hearing his thoughts -- especially when he is asked to speak on the Bill of Rights. That's something we'd like to hope he knows quite a bit about as a Supreme Court justice.

But recently, when Thomas took the podium to address high school essay-contest winners, he seemed to forget he was there to talk about the Constitution. Read more

Pages