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AU To Supreme Court: Muslim Ban Violates Constitution’s Promise Of Religious Freedom And Fairness

Today, Americans United and our allies told the U.S. Supreme Court that President Donald Trump’s Muslim ban is an unconstitutional violation of America’s fundamental promise of religious freedom.

Religious freedom is about fairness – we don’t treat people differently because their beliefs are different from ours, and we certainly don’t ban people from America based on their religion. But that’s just what Trump’s Muslim ban does.

Americans United And Allies Tell Supreme Court President Trump’s Muslim Ban Is An Unconstitutional Violation Of Religious Freedom

Barring People From This Country Because Of Their Religious Beliefs Is Fundamentally Un-American

Americans United for Separation of Church and State joined allied religious and civil-rights organizations and members of the clergy today in telling the U.S. Supreme Court that President Donald Trump’s Muslim ban is an unconstitutional violation of religious freedom.

Justice Department Tells Supreme Court That A Colo. Bakery Had The Right To Discriminate Against A Same-Sex Couple

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Justice told the Supreme Court that a Colorado bakery has a constitutional right to refuse to sell a cake to a same-sex couple for their wedding. You read that right – the Trump administration thinks there’s a constitutional right to discriminate.

Battling The Ban

The pace of the legal battle over President Donald J. Trump’s Muslim ban remained brisk over the summer.

On June 26, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it will review two of the cases involving Trump’s executive order that bans travelers from six Muslim-majority countries. The high court is scheduled to hear arguments on Oct. 10 in Trump v. Hawaii and Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project.

A Hole In The Wall

The U.S. Supreme Court may have resolved one legal battle when it ruled in the Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Comer case, but the ramifications of that decision will likely be debated in courtrooms across the country for years to come.

Rallying Against Religious Discrimination At The White House

Yesterday, some of my colleagues and I joined allies outside the White House to protest dangerous Trump-era policies that restrict immigration based on color, ethnicity and religion.

“No hate! No fear! Immigrants are welcome here. No hate! No fear! Muslims are welcome here. No hate! No fear! Refugees are welcome here.” These are chants that could be heard loud and clear during the event, which was organized by New York Immigration Coalition.

The Supreme Court Has Decided The Trinity Lutheran Case. What Happens Now?

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court decided the biggest church–state case of the term: Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Comer. Americans United gave a quick run-down of the opinion when it was released, but now it’s time to look ahead at what the decision means for the future.

A Colo. Case Gives The Supreme Court An Opportunity To Say That Businesses Can’t Use Religion As An Excuse To Discriminate

Monday was the two-year anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, the landmark case in which the high court recognized the rights of same-sex couples to marry. The Supreme Court chose that anniversary to announce it will review Masterpiece Cakeshop v.

The Supreme Court Took Three Important Actions Today. Here’s What They Mean For Church-State Separation.

The U.S. Supreme Court went out of session this morning and did so with a bang. The high court took three actions that affect church-state separation.

Here’s a rundown on what happened:

Trinity Lutheran v. Comer: Americans United has been warning for more than a year that it could erode the church-state wall. The ruling is harmful – but not as bad as it might have been.

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