Subscribe to RSS - South Carolina

Detached From Reality: Religious Right Claims Charleston Massacre Is Proof Of Anti-Christian Bias

On June 17, Dylann Storm Roof walked into Charleston, S.C.’s Mother Emanuel AME Church. He sat there for an hour – quietly, by all accounts – and pulled out a handgun and opened fire. State Sen. Clementa Pinckney (D-Beaufort), Sharonda Singleton, Myra Thompson, Tywanza Sanders, Ethel Lance, Cynthia Hurd, Daniel Simmons, DePayne Middleton-Doctor and Susie Jackson are dead.  

They are dead because Dylann Roof hated black people. Read more

The Swinney Switch: Clemson University Football Coach Declines To Attend Fundraiser For Anti-LGBT Group

South Carolina’s second-highest paid employee was in a bit of a predicament last week. He has been accused in the past of using taxpayer money to proselytize, and now he finds himself under fire thanks to an award from an organization with a history of attacking LGBT rights. Read more

S.C. Legislature Considers Several Troubling Bills

Pre-filed bills for the 2015 legislative session indicate that separation of church and state is under threat in South Carolina. These bills include two school choice measures that would create more opportunities for subsidies of private religious education.

Senate Bill 24 would allow parents to deduct the cost of private sectarian education, as well as homeschooling, from their annual state income taxes. Critics of the bill slam it for allowing special incentives for families who choose sectarian schools. Read more

States Of Prayer: Legislators In Three States Push Bills To Promote Religion In Public Schools

The Supreme Court made it clear decades ago that our public schools aren’t meant to be places for spreading religion. But for legislators in three states, court rulings are no deterrent to their dogmatic agendas.

Lawmakers in South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee are debating bills that are designed, supporters say, to “put prayer back in schools.” The tactics vary, but in each case the desired outcome is the same: a potentially unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state. And the legislators behind the bills aren’t shy about their motivations.
Read more

Jail Tale: South Carolina County Puts Religious Freedom Behind Bars

My first job in Washington, D.C., was with a non-profit that served the correctional community. In 1986, a bunch of us on the staff spent the night in a new state-of-the-art jail that had just been constructed in Prince George’s County, Md. We wore jail uniforms and ate dry sandwiches for dinner. The lights snapped off at 10 p.m. sharp and came back on at 6 the next morning.

That was my only brush with the correctional system – and it was enough. Read more