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Religious Right Legal Group Issues Misleading Poll On The Johnson Amendment

Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) is heralding the results of a new poll it commissioned among Protestant pastors and claiming it proves pastors oppose the Johnson Amendment, which is the provision in the tax code that ensures tax-exempt organizations, including houses of worship, do not endorse political candidates.

The problem for ADF is that the poll doesn’t actually show that at all.

Proposed Provision To Weaken The Johnson Amendment Heads To House Floor

Yesterday, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cripple the IRS’ ability to enforce the Johnson Amendment – the law that ensures tax-exempt nonprofits, including houses of worship, cannot endorse or oppose candidates.

Nonprofits And Faith Groups To Congressional Leaders: Churches Aren’t Political Tools

108 Nonprofits And Religious Organizations Sign Letter – Changes To Johnson Amendment Would Allow Politicians To Pressure Churches For Endorsements

Americans United for Separation of Church and State today joined 108 organizations that wrote to the House Appropriations Committee to urge its members to oppose a provision in the Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act that would weaken the enforcement mechanisms of the Johnson Amendment.

Congress Should Not Undermine The Johnson Amendment

Tomorrow, the House of Representatives’ Appropriations Committee will vote on a bill that could cripple enforcement of the Johnson Amendment. Americans United has joined with 108 other organizations to urge the committee to strip the troubling provision.

AU Sends Letters Reminding Churches To Remain Non-Partisan

Americans United in September mailed letters to 100,000 houses of worship nationwide, reminding religious leaders that it is a violation of federal law if they use church resources to endorse or oppose candidates for office this election season.

In the letter, Americans United Executive Director Barry W. Lynn explained what houses of worship can and can’t do when it comes to political activity.

Pulpit Politicking – A Threat To America’s Houses Of Worship

By The Rev. Dr. Rollin O. Russell
 

Republican presidential candidate Donald J. Trump has been telling audiences for months now that he wants to abolish the federal law that says non-profit, tax-exempt organizations can’t engage in partisan political activity by endorsing or opposing candidates for public office.

The Persistence Of Pulpit Politicking

During a sermon in May 2008, the Rev. Gus Booth made absolutely sure his congregation knew precisely which presidential candidates he did not want them to back.

“If you are a Christian, you cannot support Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama.…Both Hillary and Barack favor the shedding of innocent blood (abortion) and the legalization of the abomination of homosexual marriage,” Booth, senior pastor of Warroad Community Church in Minnesota, said at the time.

Church-Based Politicking: It’s Time For The IRS To Enforce Our Nation’s Laws

The Internal Revenue Service has hit a rough patch lately.

The agency, never anyone’s favorite to begin with, has been slammed by congressional conservatives who have cut funding and made it difficult for the IRS to reach full staffing levels.

A few years ago, reports circulated that the IRS had unfairly targeted Tea Party groups for heightened scrutiny. As it turned out, there was less to the story than was reported, but the matter exploded and one top official, Lois Lerner, was forced to step down.

Trump Says IRS Out To Get Him For ‘Strong Christian’ Beliefs

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump said recently that the Internal Revenue Service is targeting him because of his religious beliefs.

All high-profile presidential candidates are expected to release their tax returns at some point during the campaign, but Trump had not yet done so as of early March. He claimed he wasn’t able to because he is a frequent target of audits – although it’s unclear why that would prevent him making his returns public.

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