'mayday For Marriage' Rally Promotes Partisan Agenda, Says Americans United

Rally Organizers Seek To 'Impose Religious Right Values On All Americans,' Charges AU's Lynn

A "Mayday for Marriage" rally in Washington, D.C., Oct. 15 is a partisan political event intended to advance the Religious Right agenda, according to Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

The rally, endorsed by an array of Religious Right organizations, is ostensibly intended to support a Federal Marriage Amendment. But comments by the Rev. Ken Hutcherson, a Washington State preacher who organized the rally, suggests a broader political agenda aimed at the November elections.

Said Americans United Executive Director Barry W. Lynn, "This is a partisan political rally pure and simple. It is intended to whip up enthusiasm for President George W. Bush and other Republican candidates who have endorsed the Federal Marriage Amendment.

"Religious Right leaders are doing everything in their power to spark Election Day turnout by evangelical Christians, and this event is one project among many," Lynn continued.

"Their long-term goal," Lynn concluded, "is a government that imposes Religious Right values on all Americans through force of law. I think we need a 'Mayday for the Constitution.'" 

In an interview with the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published Oct. 14, Hutcherson said judges are legislating from the bench. He said he and his allies were going to work toward the removal of judges and those politicians who support same-sex marriage.

Observed Hutcherson, "We're going to change your office window view."

Asked if that's why he and others are holding the rally 18 days before the general election, Hutcherson replied, "That's why we're holding the rally. Because politicians understand one thing: how to stay in office, whether they are Christians or not."

Hutcherson said Christian voters must choose the lesser of two evils when it comes to this year's elections. "Right now," he said, "I think the Republican Party is the lesser of two evils."

Hutcherson, pastor of Antioch Bible Church in Redmond, Wash., also blasted church-state separation.

"The Constitution never says there was a separation of church and state," he told the newspaper. "It is the freedom of religion, not the freedom from religion."

Americans United for Separation of Church and State is a religious liberty watchdog group based in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1947, the organization educates Americans about the importance of church-state separation in the safeguarding religious freedom.

Americans United is a religious liberty watchdog group based in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1947, the organization educates Americans about the importance of church-state separation in safeguarding religious freedom.