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Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Various secular, for-profit businesses with religious owners have filed lawsuits asserting that they cannot include contraception coverage in employee health plans without violating, among other things, their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).  Read more

Bronx Household of Faith v. Board of Education of the City of New York

The New York City Board of Education generally allows private groups, including religious groups, to use school buildings when school is not in session. To ensure that the government does not impermissibly endorse or promote religion, however, the Board prohibits the use of public-school buildings for religious worship services. Despite this policy, the congregation of the Bronx Household of Faith had held Sunday worship services, rent free, in a New York City public middle school as a result of litigation dating back to 2001.
 
In June 2011, the U.S.

Hewett v. City of King

In 2004, the City of King constructed a veterans’ memorial on public land in Central Park. The memorial included the Christian flag—which features a white field with a red cross inside a blue canton. The City later added a statue of a soldier kneeling before a Latin cross, and also holds annual memorial ceremonies featuring Christian prayers and other religious content.
 
In 2010, the City temporarily removed the Christian flag from the Veterans Memorial.

Duncan v. State of New Hampshire

In June 2012, the New Hampshire legislature enacted legislation allowing businesses to receive tax credits for donations to “scholarship organizations.” The scholarship organizations, in turn, would use the funds to award scholarships to elementary- and secondary-school students, including those attending religious schools. Religious schools would be free to use program funds for any purpose, including religious indoctrination and proselytization.

A.M. ex rel. McKay v. Taconic Hills Central School District

A middle-school student in the Taconic Hills Central School District in New York was invited to deliver a speech at the school's graduation ceremony. After she submitted a draft of her speech to school administrators for their approval, the school notified her that she was not permitted to conclude the speech with a religious message. Read more

Wirtz v. City of South Bend

In June 2011, the City of South Bend approved a plan to purchase a piece of land for $1.2 million and donate it to a Catholic school (St. Joseph's High School) to use for a football stadium and other athletic facilities. The religious school was handpicked by the City to receive the land, and the City permitted the school to use the land for religious purposes, including prayers at athletic events.   Read more

Sherman v. Illinois

A group called Friends of the Cross received $20,000 from the Illinois legislature to refurbish Bald Knob Cross, which the group claims is the largest cross in the western hemisphere. The earmark was awarded by a state senator out of what is essentially a legislative slush fund, and the earmark required the executive branch to provide the taxpayer funds. Read more

Town of Greece v. Galloway

For years, the Greece Town Board has invited clergy to open the Board’s monthly meetings with a prayer. Over the past decade, all but two of the guest chaplains have been Christian, and the vast majority of prayers have been explicitly Christian. Guest chaplains often ask citizens to join in the prayers, and citizens face considerable pressure to participate. In February 2008, we filed a lawsuit on behalf of two local citizens, alleging that the Town’s practices violate the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Read more

Does v. Enfield Public Schools

Starting in 2007, the Enfield Public Schools (located just north of Hartford, Connecticut) began holding the Schools’ two high-school graduations in the sanctuary of a Christian church, the First Cathedral. An enormous white cross sits atop the Cathedral’s roof, dominating the skyline as one approaches. To enter the building for graduations, students and their guests pass under another large cross in the Cathedral’s facade. Read more

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