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Hickenlooper v. Freedom From Religion Foundation

In 1952 Congress established a National Day of Prayer, later designated as the first Thursday in March. The National Day of Prayer Task Force, a nonprofit organization with the goal of “mobilizing the Christian community to intercede for America and its leadership,” has made annual requests to state governments to issue official state prayer proclamations in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Holt v. Hobbs

Gregory Holt goes by the name Abdul Maalik Muhammed and identifies as a devout Salafist Muslim. The prison where Holt is incarcerated bans all facial hair for inmates, ostensibly for security purposes. But prisoners suffering from skin conditions are given an exception and allowed to grow quarter-inch beards, and both the federal government and most other states allow inmates to wear beards for religious reasons. Holt’s request for an accommodation to grow a half-inch beard, in accordance with his faith, was denied by correctional officials. Read more

Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Burwell

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Various secular, for-profit businesses with religious owners have filed lawsuits asserting that they cannot include contraception coverage in employee health plans without violating, among other things, their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). Read more

Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.

As part of the Affordable Care Act's implementing regulations, group health plans are required to include coverage for various forms of preventative care, including all FDA-approved methods of contraception. Various secular, for-profit businesses with religious owners have filed lawsuits asserting that they cannot include contraception coverage in employee health plans without violating, among other things, their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).  Read more

Bronx Household of Faith v. Board of Education of the City of New York

The New York City Board of Education generally allows private groups, including religious groups, to use school buildings when school is not in session. To ensure that the government does not impermissibly endorse or promote religion, however, the Board prohibits the use of public-school buildings for religious worship services. Despite this policy, the congregation of the Bronx Household of Faith had held Sunday worship services, rent free, in a New York City public middle school as a result of litigation dating back to 2001.
 
In June 2011, the U.S.

Hewett v. City of King

In 2004, the City of King constructed a veterans’ memorial on public land in Central Park. The memorial included the Christian flag—which features a white field with a red cross inside a blue canton. The City later added a statue of a soldier kneeling before a Latin cross, and also holds annual memorial ceremonies featuring Christian prayers and other religious content.
 
In 2010, the City temporarily removed the Christian flag from the Veterans Memorial.

Duncan v. State of New Hampshire

In June 2012, the New Hampshire legislature enacted legislation allowing businesses to receive tax credits for donations to “scholarship organizations.” The scholarship organizations, in turn, would use the funds to award scholarships to elementary- and secondary-school students, including those attending religious schools. Religious schools would be free to use program funds for any purpose, including religious indoctrination and proselytization.

A.M. ex rel. McKay v. Taconic Hills Central School District

A middle-school student in the Taconic Hills Central School District in New York was invited to deliver a speech at the school's graduation ceremony. After she submitted a draft of her speech to school administrators for their approval, the school notified her that she was not permitted to conclude the speech with a religious message. Read more

Wirtz v. City of South Bend

In June 2011, the City of South Bend approved a plan to purchase a piece of land for $1.2 million and donate it to a Catholic school (St. Joseph's High School) to use for a football stadium and other athletic facilities. The religious school was handpicked by the City to receive the land, and the City permitted the school to use the land for religious purposes, including prayers at athletic events.   Read more

Sherman v. Illinois

A group called Friends of the Cross received $20,000 from the Illinois legislature to refurbish Bald Knob Cross, which the group claims is the largest cross in the western hemisphere. The earmark was awarded by a state senator out of what is essentially a legislative slush fund, and the earmark required the executive branch to provide the taxpayer funds. Read more

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