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Impaired Judgment: Justice Scalia Just Doesn’t Know When To Stop Talking

It didn’t get much attention, but Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gave an interesting address recently at a Catholic university in Pittsburgh.

Scalia spoke at an event marking the 100th anniversary of Duquesne University Law School. It was the usual lament from the ultra-conservative justice: American society is going hell because not enough people agree with Scalia.

Access Denied: Supreme Court Slams The Courthouse Door In The Face Of Church-State Litigants

Thanks to yesterday’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, it will now be a lot easier for the government to fund religion.

The high court, in a 5-4 decision in Arizona Christian Tuition Organization v. Winn, ruled that taxpayers have no right to challenge tax credits, exemptions or deductions that support religious organizations.

The Phelps Decision: Supreme Court Decision Undercuts Religious Right Lie

As I’m sure everyone knows by now, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld the right of Westboro Baptist Church to picket near the funerals of soldiers who died while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In any writing about Westboro Baptist, it is important to immediately make it clear that the messages from Pastor Fred Phelps and his family are vile, obnoxious and disgusting. But, as the high court has made clear, even jerks have free-speech rights.

Tax Credit Tangle: Supreme Court Considers Legality Of Ariz. Religious School Aid

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments this morning in an important case dealing with government aid to religion.

Two issues are at stake in Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn. The high court will decide whether an Arizona program that gives taxpayers a 100 percent credit for money they donate to private organizations that provide private school vouchers is constitutional.

The justices will also determine whether taxpayers have the right to challenge the program – a legal doctrine known as “standing.”

Elena And The End-Times: Will Kagan Usher In The Apocalypse? (The Religious Right Thinks So)

Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan are in full swing, and as Americans United had hoped, we’re getting some questions about separation of church and state.

Yesterday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) asked Kagan about the relationship between the First Amendment’s “Establishment Clause,” which bars laws “respecting an establishment of religion” and the Free Exercise Clause,” which curbs laws “prohibiting the free exercise” of religion. Together they provide for religious liberty and the separation of church and state.

Cross Theft Lesson: Government Neutrality On Religion Helps Prevent Interfaith Conflict

Earlier this week, we heard reports that someone had stolen the Latin cross that was the subject of the recent Supreme Court decision, Salazar v. Buono.

As you may recall, Justice Anthony Kennedy issued an opinion that likely paves the way for the religious symbol to remain in the Mojave National Preserve. He said that the cross was not merely a religious symbol, but could serve as a memorial for all those who have fought for our country.

The High Court And The Church-State Wall: Betsy Ross, Meet Sandra Day O'Connor

Prayers and patriotic songs reverberated through the air as I made my way to the Supreme Court yesterday morning. I exchanged a reticent glance with the police officer stationed outside the Library of Congress (just a block away), and he chuckled, as if to read my mind.

"Things are getting crazy over there," he warned, as I dug my notepad from my bag.

"Big case," I responded.

A Cross – The Great Divide: Justices Seem Split On Calif. Religious Symbol Case

I spent the morning at the Supreme Court attending oral arguments in Salazar v. Buono – a case focusing on a cross on display in the Mojave National Preserve in California.

I'm not going to pretend I understand all of the ins and outs of this complex case because I'm not a lawyer. I rely on AU's legal team to do that. But I did garner a few impressions from the argument.

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