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Ark Park No Help To Economy, Says Ky. County Official

Australian creationist Ken Ham’s Ark Encounter, a taxpayer-subsidized re-creation of Noah’s Ark in Williams­town, Ky., is not providing the economic boost local officials had hoped for.

“It’s been a great thing but it’s not brought us any money,” Grant County Judge-Executive Steve Wood told Lexington’s WKYT-TV recently. “I was one of those believers that once the Ark was here everything was going to come in. But it’s not done it. It’s not done it. I think the Ark’s done well and I’m glad for them on that. But it’s not done us good at all.”

Creationist Ken Ham’s Ky. 'Ark Park' Fails To Lift All Boats

When Australian creationist Ken Ham pitched the idea of building a giant Noah’s Ark in a rural area of Kentucky, folks in the community of Williamstown got excited. Many of them were certain that the ark would become a major tourist attraction and bring visitors – and their cash – to this struggling area.

More Baloney From Ken Ham

Ken Ham has been on quite a tear against Americans United lately. The Australian creationist is all worked up because AU continues to point out the inconvenient fact that he built his Ark Encounter park, a re-creation of Noah’s Ark in northern Kentucky, in part on the backs of the state’s taxpayers.

Kentucky Gov. Calls For Yet Another ‘Year of the Bible’

It will be the “Year of the Bible” for the second year in a row in Kentucky.

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin in December signed a proclamation recognizing 2017 as the “Year of the Bible.”

“Whereas, 2017 marks the 2nd year Kentucky has led the nation in celebrating the Bible’s significant impact on Kentucky and American institutions and culture by leaders in each county taking shifts to read through the entire Bible in Kentucky’s Bible Reading Marathon beginning January 1, 2017,” the proclamation begins.

Go Ahead And Break The Law, Ky. Governor Tells Pastors

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin (R) had a major ethics lapse recently when he advised clergy to break the law.

In an address to a group of pastors at the governor’s mansion, Bevin told them that even though the federal tax code prohibits houses of worship (and other 501(c)(3) organizations) from endorsing or opposing candidates for office, the Internal Revenue Service is just a “paper tiger” so there’s nothing to worry about.

Ky. Governor Intervenes In First Amendment Case

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin (R) has asked a federal court to nullify a settlement guaranteeing that children in publicly funded religious care facilities will not be subject to proselytization.

According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, Bevin’s general counsel claimed that the settlement previously reached in Pedreira v. Sunrise Children’s Services was not “fair, adequate nor reasonable to the commonwealth or its private child care provider partners.”

A Flood Of Nonsense: Ken Ham’s False Dichotomy

Ken Ham’s $102 million Ark Encounter theme park in Williamstown, Ky., opens today. The official launch of this boat on dry land has led to a spate of media attention for the Australian creationist and would-be Noah.

Ham’s “ark park” was the subject of a lengthy New York Times story recently, during which Ham admitted, yet again, that the entire project has one goal: converting people to his brand of fundamentalist Christianity.

Keeping Secrets?: Kim Davis Accused Of Violating Ky. Open-Records Law

Kim Davis’ legal woes aren’t quite over yet. The office of the State Attorney General announced yesterday that the embattled Rowan County clerk may have violated the Kentucky Open Records Act when she refused to comply with a records request from a Washington, D.C.-based government watchdog.

Supreme Court Declines Ky. Religious Home’s Appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a long-running lawsuit over the public funding of a sectarian children’s home in Kentucky.

In May, the high court sent Pedreira v. Sunrise Children’s Services back to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; the appeals court subsequently sent it back to a federal trial court for further proceedings.

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